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    1. Framework laptop review

      I've seen a few posts about the Framework Laptop on Tildes and since I received mine, I thought I'd do a write up for it. I've been using the Framework laptop for a few weeks now and it's been...

      I've seen a few posts about the Framework Laptop on Tildes and since I received mine, I thought I'd do a write up for it.

      I've been using the Framework laptop for a few weeks now and it's been great so far. I was originally skeptical but I decided that I would take a shot at it as I've been growing increasingly unhappy with the design decisions that Apple has been making with MacOS.

      I ordered the DIY kit, which was nice since I already had an NVMe SSD I could use with it, so I ended up saving about $150. It only took about 20 minutes to get the RAM, SSD and wifi card installed.

      Specs:

      • Intel i7-1165G7
      • 32 GB of RAM
      • Intel WiFi 6E card

      Total cost: $1,422.03.

      Unfortunately my first laptop arrived with a dead display. The Framework support team was pretty helpful and quickly sent out a new one, which works perfectly.

      After toying around with Linux Mint and a few other distros, I ended up installing the Windows 11 beta. Getting the drivers installed was easy, since Framework offers a single download that runs one script to install all necessary drivers in unattended mode. Just hit one button and restart - all the drivers are installed. I wish all manufacturers offered something similar.

      Overall construction is great. For something as modular as this, it feels extremely solid and well built. While the build quality isn't equal to something like a MacBook, I'd say it's on par with a Dell XPS or similar high end machine.

      The screen is nice and bright, with accurate colors. I've always been a fan of 3:2 screens on laptops and moving from a MacBook Pro with a 16-inch 16:9 display to the 13.5-inch 3:2 display on the Framework doesn't feel like losing too much real estate. Having the taller display is great for sites like Tildes, where it can fit almost the same amount of content as a much larger screen.

      The keyboard and trackpad are both great. The keys remind me of the older pre-2015 style MacBook keyboards before they switched to the butterfly mechanism. They are bouncy and responsive, with a nice feedback that doesn't feel too harsh like the butterfly keyboards do. The trackpad is pretty good and it uses the Windows Precision drivers, so it supports swiping and pinching if you like that. It does sound a bit louder than my MacBook Pro's trackpad.

      The speakers are a bit disappointing. The max loudness is pretty anemic. Even in a normal acoustic environment (A/C running in a house), you have to actively listen to hear. Coming from a MacBook Pro 16-inch, I would say that the speakers are the biggest downgrade.

      The main draw of the Framework is the expandability and upgradability.

      The Framework modules are a fantastic idea and I love them. While they don't save you from having to carry around adapters, it is really nice to have those adapters slot in to your machine and feel more integrated. I purchased 2 USB-C, 2 full-sized USB, a DisplayPort, and an HDMI adapter. Being able to just slot in a USB A port and swap it for a display out one on the rare occasion that I need it has been great. I love being able to adapt the ports on my laptop to a situation without having to have dongles coming out of the side of my laptop.

      The adapters are tiny and easily fit in any backpack or carrying case. I'm really curious to see what new adapters they offer in the future and what crazy niche ones third parties come up with. I'd love to see a cellular modem jammed into one of these things. Or maybe one that can hide a dongle for my wireless keyboard and mouse?

      Battery life is...fine. It's an all day machine, but you'll definitely need to charge it every day if you're using it a good deal. The battery is on the smaller side, but it gets me through a normal work day so that's good enough. But when the battery goes bad (as all Lithium-Ion batteries do), it's an easy fix.

      In terms of upgradability, getting into the laptop is dead simple. There's five screws on the bottom and then entire top deck (keyboard and trackpad) comes off. Everything is easily accessible and sensibly laid out. It's also all labeled with QR codes that take you to specific guides on how to install/upgrade those components. I think the educational component is great. It really shows people who would have never thought to upgrade their RAM or storage how easy it can be.

      That's the big selling point for me. If I decide in a year or two that I need more than 1TB of storage, I can just buy a larger drive and stick it in there. Or if my display dies, I can get a one for a lot less than the cost of replacing the laptop. Or if the keyboard or trackpad dies, then I can easily replace just that component. On my MacBook Pro, replacing the keyboard is an $800+ repair, since it involves replacing the entire top case, which includes the motherboard and other expensive components.

      For years we've been hearing from manufacturers that they can't make a laptop thin, light and upgradable. This laptop proves them wrong.

      My biggest concern is the long term viability of the company. It's nice that they made an upgradable laptop, but if they aren't around in a year or two to keep selling replacement parts, then it doesn't matter much.

      Overall, I'm pretty impressed with the Framework and I plan on keeping it and making it my daily driver.

      33 votes
    2. Need a laptop for school, budget $2000, details inside

      Hi everyone, I'm looking into getting a new laptop for university work. Thanks to a scholarship, I can get up to $2000 covered off a laptop purchase (and I'd be willing to pay a few hundred more...

      Hi everyone, I'm looking into getting a new laptop for university work. Thanks to a scholarship, I can get up to $2000 covered off a laptop purchase (and I'd be willing to pay a few hundred more out-of-pocket too).

      I plan on using this laptop primarily for basic web browsing, word processing, and Zoom calls. I may be playing some video games on it like Slay the Spire or Hollow Knight, but these aren't too demanding and most of my time will be spent working anyway. My use case shouldn't require a lot of processing power or a high-end dedicated GPU. After graduating, I'll have more consistent access to my desktop anyway, which already has a dedicated card for gaming and can easily be upgraded to suit my needs if I get into video editing or programming, which further reduces the need for a laptop that can do these things. In light of this, I'm looking primarily at a laptop that is lightweight, has a long battery life, good build quality, and a 14-inch screen, to upgrade from my current 13-inch. I haven't decided whether I'll be dual-booting Windows/Linux or running Linux only, but I do plan on running Linux so compatibility is important. Ports aren't a huge deal since there isn't much need for anything more than HDMI/USB on a college campus and I can get a docking station for post-graduation needs.

      After lurking around on this forum and others, I've settled on a few potential options:

      • Thinkpad X1 Carbon
      • Thinkpad T14s
      • System76 Lemur Pro
      • MacBook M1 Air (added after suggestions, link to specs)

      ThinkPads seem to offer the best build quality and potential to last years after purchase, so I'm leaning towards those, but System76 appears to have upgraded their build quality recently, and I just love their designs as well. Lenovo will be releasing the next-generation X1 Carbon soon, but it may be priced out of my range, and I'd like to purchase soon. Even the Carbon Gen 8 is above my price range, though as I understand it Lenovo usually offers discounts so I'm waiting for the sale on customizable builds (they already have discounts on pre-designed builds). I'm totally open to suggestions not on this list, and I've also read that purchasing refurbished ThinkPads can be the way to go, though I'd like to take full advantage of my budget if possible. If anyone has any experience with the above laptops, reason to recommend one over the other, or knows why I might want to wait on purchasing (e.g. for a release of next-gen hardware), please let me know!

      basic hardware comparison
      blank T14s X1 Carbon (Gen 8) Lemur Pro
      starting weight (lbs) 2.8 2.4 2.4
      advertised battery life (hrs) 13.6 13.5 14
      Linux compatibility compatible Fedora pre-installed Pop_OS! pre-installed

      edit: Table working now!

      edit2: Thanks for all the suggestions and discussion everyone. I've yet to make a final decision but will update again later.

      15 votes
    3. Suggestions for no-display laptop

      This is more specific than ~talk would normally have , but tildes doesn't have anything for shopping yet, so... I'm using my laptop right now, but I've found that for a lot of the stuff on my...

      This is more specific than ~talk would normally have
      , but tildes doesn't have anything for shopping yet, so...

      I'm using my laptop right now, but I've found that for a lot of the stuff on my computer,
      I don't really need a screen. I like using the terminal, and can get a lot done just typing:
      no mouse or display. I think this would be great, as I already do a lot of my casual writing
      and note taking my eyes closed, leaning back in a chair.

      What's the best machine that meets these qualifications? Basically, I just need a way to read memory
      out to another drive. Battery would be a must as well.

      Thanks

      12 votes
    4. Microsoft announces new Surface Laptop Go and Surface Pro X

      I couldn’t find a good roundup that covered both of these and didn’t want to add clutter to the front page with two posts. From The Verge: Microsoft’s new $549 Surface Laptop Go aims to compete...

      I couldn’t find a good roundup that covered both of these and didn’t want to add clutter to the front page with two posts.

      From The Verge:

      The Surface Pro X seems like just a spec bump, so there isn’t too much interesting there. But the Surface Laptop Go is interesting. The base model is absolute garbage (4 GB of RAM and 64 GB of EMMC storage) but the other models are somewhat decent.

      The overall design of the Surface products is really striking. I honestly think they look much more modern and clean than Apple’s laptops. I also really love that they are offering colors. I wish Apple would offer more colors than just gray, silver and pink/gold on their laptops.

      9 votes
    5. 4K screen on 15" laptop - worth it?

      Pricing up my next Thinkpad (I'm a lifer for Thinkpads I think now) and I keep hovering over the 4K screen option. I'm looking at a 15.6" screen. The FHD 14" screen I currently have is lovely and...

      Pricing up my next Thinkpad (I'm a lifer for Thinkpads I think now) and I keep hovering over the 4K screen option. I'm looking at a 15.6" screen. The FHD 14" screen I currently have is lovely and sharp with a decent colour gamut, and I don't think I can see pixels, even now when the machine is literally on my lap. I'd guess the screen is maybe 35cm from my eyes at the moment.

      I don't really game, I do edit photos, video (HD, not 4K) and do a little 3D work with Blender/FreeCAD/etc. I usually run Debian/Gnome, occasionally dropping into Windows because my 3D printer's preferred slicing software is Windows only (grrrr).

      The other bonus to 4K is HDR400 and twice as many nits of brightness but again, I'm not sure that's worth an extra £250. I'd probably turn the brightness down anyway. The HDR is potentially interesting but as I don't watch TV/movies on this machine and my camera doesn't output HDR, that's likely not very useful despite sounding good. I could buy quite a lot more compute power and ram with that money instead..

      I would go and look at one in person but I have no idea where the nearest 4K Thinkpad is, in person, and even if I did, I don't really want to go into shops right now.

      Any thoughts, experiences, advice, etc would be much appreciated.

      9 votes
    6. Should I buy? ThinkPad T14s, Ryzen 7 4750U, 32GB 3200MHz DDR4, $1,300

      Thanks to everyone who commented with their thoughts. In the end I decided to wait (even longer) before I buy a laptop. Text Before we dive into the nuances of if I should buy a new laptop or when...

      Thanks to everyone who commented with their thoughts. In the end I decided to wait (even longer) before I buy a laptop.

      Text

      Before we dive into the nuances of if I should buy a new laptop or when I should make that purchase, here are some links for those of you who were caught by the title:


      Onto my spiel:

      I have been talking about getting a new laptop on Tildes for literally two years. Now I am at the point when I think I have found the right device, but am still unsure if I should spend the money to get it.


      Why do I want a new laptop?

      The main reason that I want a new laptop is that next August (2021) I will be transferring to a university and living on campus for two years. My laptop is going to take up a much more important role in my day-to-day activities and replace my desktop as my workstation.


      Why not just use my current laptop?

      My current laptop is a Dell Chromebook 13 that I bought refurbished in early 2016 for $216. (Specifications can be found in the table below.) I've talked about it several times on Tildes before. The mileage I have gotten out of this device is insane. It has traveled thousands of miles with me across the United States, comes with me just about every time I leave the house, and is still in good condition in every measurable way. It is by far the best thing I have ever purchased in terms of a cost-to-value ratio.

      However, it was already a low-end device when it released in late 2015 and now, in 2020, its age is becoming apparent. The two biggest issues I have with continuing to use this device are:

      • Performance. General tasks like web browsing are done with a noticeable sluggishness. Programming in languages like Java and using an editor like Visual Studio Code, with the relevant language extensions, is difficult and resource-expensive. The device's performance constraints are a big reason I started using Vim. The device's thermals are fine, even under full load when compiling software, but it's an old computer and there is a very real speed penalty associated with that. I don't know what kind of stuff I'll be doing in university (either as part of my education or just on the side), but I would prefer if performance constraints weren't this giant dark cloud hanging over my head.

      • Connectivity. This laptop only has two USB Type-A ports and a single HDMI port. Sure, that's more ports than some ultrabooks these days, but the advantages provided by USB Type-C mean that this laptop falls behind modern offerings when it comes to connectivity potential. At university, my laptop is going to replace my desktop as my main device, and that means it will have to be able to connect to a variety of peripherals, including dual ultrawide monitors, external drives, a drawing display, and more. My current laptop just does not have the connectivity to use all of these things at once.


      Originally, before I put a lot of thought into transferring to another university and what that would entail, I had decided that I simply wanted a device that I could draw and take notes on. Despite dunking on it a bit, I liked the idea of getting a Surface Go because even as under powered as it was when it released, it was still faster than my laptop, much more portable, and I could draw and take notes on it. I decided I would wait "for the mythical Surface Go 2 to release" and probably buy that.

      Well, by the time the Surface Go 2 did release, my requirements changed, and I realized that I wanted good performance and connectivity in addition to some sort of two-in-one, touchscreen capability. That, and it was disappointingly similar to its predecessor. The Surface Go 2 wasn't going to cut it.

      Eventually I discovered the HP Spectre x360, which seemed to have just about everything I needed and wanted, but concerns over the lifespan of its 4K OLED display, and the generally poor performance of Intel Ice Lake chips compared to AMD's Renoir offerings, soured me a bit on the device. At the very least, I would wait until the Tiger Lake refresh of the device releases later this year before buying.

      Then I looked at the HP ENVY x360, which has the latest Ryzen Renoir chips, but no Thunderbolt 3. Technically, the fifteen-inch Envy with its regular USB Type-C port and HDMI port (something missing on the thirteen-inch) would provide enough connectivity to meet all of my demands, but just barely. It also only comes with a 1080p display. No 4K option.


      Finally, after spending a month or two bewildered at the current state of laptops, I stumbled upon the AMD version of the ThinkPad T14s. At first, it doesn't look like a very compelling option, with configurations starting at $1,529.

      However, as is always the case with Lenovo, there's a coupon (think45).

      After customizing the laptop, adding a coupon, and getting a student discount, it looks like I can order the device, taxes and all, for under $1,300.

      That price is for a configuration with the Ryzen 7 4750U, 32 GB of DDR4 3200MHz memory, the 400 nits low power display, and a 128 GB SSD. (Lenovo's storage upgrade prices are ridiculous. I'll spend $100 on a third party SSD and install it myself.)

      To me, this seems like a great deal, considering that this laptop's hardware is as good or better than my desktop's hardware (except for the lack of dedicated graphics, of course). The processor is ridiculously fast, it has twice the RAM as my desktop, it has a slot for cellular connectivity or a second SSD, the battery is a decent size (57Wh), it has an HDMI port and two USB 3.2 Gen 2×2 Type-C ports, which is plenty of connectivity, despite lacking Thunderbolt 3.

      As far as hardware goes, it's almost perfect.

      However, it only comes with a 1080p screen. Some people think any resolution higher than 1080p is too much for a laptop display. I disagree. I'd really prefer a 1440p display, but that's only available on the Intel version of the laptop.

      (If I may rant for a second, that's a really common "mistake" made by manufacturers this year. Almost universally, the AMD versions of laptops in 2020 have been given worse configurable options than their Intel counterparts, despite the fact that the AMD processors are absolutely dominating right now. It's very annoying and I don't understand how or why manufacturers allowed this.)

      There is a possibility that a person could replace the 1080p display in the AMD version with the 1440p display from the Intel version, since both motherboard types use a 40-pin connector, but there are still some unknown details and the AMD laptop is so new, no one has done it yet (it also wouldn't be an easy procedure).

      Aside from the display resolution, I also don't like how thick the bezels are. They're about as thick as the bezels on my current laptop and generally look kind of outdated.

      Finally, the touchscreen option for the laptop's display is apparently not very good, so I'm not going to get that option. The laptop also has no convertible or two-in-one functionality. In other words, that means I can't use it for digital drawing or taking notes.

      Overall, I'm actually not too worried about that. The harsh reality is that laptop displays kind of suck for digital drawing, and so I've always planned on getting a drawing display anyways. I can just get one of those and if I really want to, use it for notes as well.

      So to summarize the pros:

      • Fast processor
      • Tons of RAM
      • Optional WWAN slot
      • Enough connectivity for all my peripherals (and then some)
      • Great price compared to competition

      The cons:

      • 1080p display
      • 16:9 aspect ratio
      • No Thunderbolt 3
      • No touchscreen or two-in-one functionality

      Honestly, my biggest hang up with the device is the display. Sure, I mentioned earlier that I might be able to take the laptop apart and replace it myself, but there is no way to know if that will ever actually be possible and goddamn, I don't want to have to do that in 2020.


      If you've made it this far, thanks for reading. It might seem like I'm taking all of this a bit too seriously, but the reality is that this is a big, expensive purchase for me and I want my next laptop to last for several years. I feel like it's something worth stressing over and discussing if it means getting it right.

      If I decided not to get the ThinkPad T14s, then my only other real option is to wait.

      As for waiting, there are a few points I'd like to raise:

      • I have just over a year before I will transfer to a university and need a new laptop, meaning the next generation of devices from Intel and AMD (Tiger Lake and Cezanne) will release before I transfer, so I could wait for those.
      • The upcoming Tiger Lake chips won't be as fast in multi-core or graphics performance as some of AMD's current Renoir chips, but their single-core performance should be better.
      • Thunderbolt 4 is coming this fall with Tiger Lake and would be even better for connectivity, but more expensive.
      • AMD's next generation of processors, Cezanne, won't support USB4 (standardized Thunderbolt 3). That will only arrive in 2022 with Rembrandt.
      • There's no telling if the situation with AMD hardware and poor laptop configurations will improve in 2021, and thus no telling if better display options will be made available.
      • There's also apparently a global pandemic or something going on? So that might disrupt supply chains and affect prices in the long-term in ways I can't predict.
      • I have doubts whether I'll be able to find the same or better hardware in a laptop for a similar price in the near future.

      On one hand, I have a fear of missing out now because of what I perceive as a really good deal for a laptop that does everything I need it to do, but misses some of the things that I want.

      On the other hand, I have a fear of missing out later because of what better, faster devices might release between a few months to a year from now.

      I'd really appreciate some advice. This is (hopefully) a twice-a-decade kind of purchase for me, so it's something I tend to put a lot of thought in to.


      Just for reference, below I have included a table of my current laptop, as well as the laptops I have seriously considered so far, including the specifications at which I would buy them.

      Spec Dell Chromebook 13 HP Spectre x360 13t HP Spectre x360 15t HP ENVY x360 13t HP ENVY x360 15t ThinkPad T14s AMD
      Height (mm) 18.40 17.02 19.90 16.51 18.80 16.10
      Width (mm) 323.4 307.0 359.9 306.6 357.9 329.0
      Depth (mm) 225.8 194.6 226.4 194.6 230.2 225.8
      Height (in) 0.72 0.67 0.79 0.65 0.74 0.63
      Width (in) 12.73 12.08 14.17 12.07 14.09 12.95
      Depth (in) 8.89 7.66 8.91 7.66 9.06 8.89
      Weight (kg) 1.50 1.30 1.92 1.33 2.00 1.27
      Weight (oz) 52.91 46.10 67.73 46.72 70.72 44.80
      Weight (lb) 3.31 2.88 4.24 2.92 4.42 2.80
      Battery 61Wh 60Wh 73Wh 51Wh 51Wh 57Wh
      CPU i3-5005u i7-1065G7 i7-10750H R7-4700u R7-4700u R7-4750u
      Memory 4GB 16GB 32GB 16GB 16GB 32GB
      Display 1920x1080 3840x2160 3840x2160 1920x1080 1920x1080 1920x1080
      Storage 128GB 2TB 2TB 2TB 2TB 2TB
      LTE No No No No No Yes
      Touchscreen No Yes Yes Yes Yes No
      Convertible No Yes Yes Yes Yes No

      What do?


      EDIT: Also, just some details that I forgot:

      • Whatever laptop I get, it's going to exclusively be running Linux.
      • I'm not particularly interested in dedicated graphics, because I won't be playing games with the laptop. Maybe a dedicated card would come in handy for some programming situations, but I'm generally not concerned about what card a laptop does/does not have.
      • Not only is the laptop going to be exclusively running Linux, but it's going to be running a minimized Linux configuration. So no desktop environment or fancy compositing. I'll also go out of my way to configure power management, just like I have with my current laptop. In other words, battery life isn't a huge concern. So long as it isn't something ridiculously low (like three hours) from the manufacturer, I'll be able to squeeze eight hours out of it.
      11 votes
    7. Apple announces new MacBook Air and iPad Pro

      I figured one thread for all of Apple's new product announcements would be enough. The new MacBook Air with the same redesigned keyboard as the 16-inch model and newer processors. I'm glad to see...

      I figured one thread for all of Apple's new product announcements would be enough.

      The new MacBook Air with the same redesigned keyboard as the 16-inch model and newer processors. I'm glad to see that they're bringing the keyboard to the rest of the lineup so quickly (I'm writing this on a 2017 MacBook Pro and this keyboard is not pleasant even after two and a half years of adjustment).

      The new iPad Pro is where things get interesting. Same design as the previous iPad Pros, but now with an ultra wide camera and a LIDAR sensor.

      The iPad Pro also has a new keyboard and trackpad accessory that looks interesting. It has an adjustable hinge that can hold the iPad at any angle, which is one of my biggest complaints with the current keyboard case. I'm interested to see how well it works in a lap when hands on videos start coming out.

      I'm excited that Apple is bringing official pointing support to iOS (beyond the basic accessibility feature in iOS 13). This could be a game changer. I'm also excited that it's coming to iOS 13.4 (and all iPads that can run it) and they aren't waiting until iOS 14 to roll out the feature. I've wanted Apple to start rolling out features on an ongoing basis (like Google is doing with the Pixel Feature Drops) rather than as one big drop every fall.

      14 votes
    8. Laptop review of Acer A315-42

      So I bought this laptop mainly for web browsing, document editing, note taking and programming with perhaps light gaming although that's not something I've tried yet. So, really just for school...

      So I bought this laptop mainly for web browsing, document editing, note taking and programming with perhaps light gaming although that's not something I've tried yet. So, really just for school work.

      Specifications

      Laptop Model : Acer Aspire 3 A315-42
      Laptop screen : 1080p IPS (with matte finish?)
      CPU : R5 3500U
      RAM : 8GB DDR4 (6GB available because of iGPU)
      Storage : 256GB SSD NVMe
      Wireless : Qualcomm Atheros QCA9377
      Wired : Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTL8111/8168/8411 (According to lspci)
      2x USB 2.0, 1x USB 3.0, 1x HDMI port, Audio jack, 1x RJ45 Ethernet port
      Battery : 36.7Wh

      Linux compatibility

      Everything worked out of the box, gotta modify TLP to not kill the touchpad and webcam. The touchpad seems to have a mind of its own when it comes to being detected, It seems to be a kernel bug, unsure what I'll do about it concretely but rebooting a couple of times makes it work. Nothing to install thanks to AMD's open source mesa drivers. Might need a kernel higher than 5.3 because of general Ryzen 3000 issues but I've not tried, it was already higher than that.

      Operating system tested

      Basically never touched Windows, directly installed Fedora 31 Silverblue.

      My Silverblue configuration is :

      ● ostree://fedora:fedora/31/x86_64/silverblue
                         Version: 31.20191213.0 (2019-12-13T00:42:11Z)
                      BaseCommit: a5829371191d0a3e26d3cced9f075525d2ea73679bd255865fcf320bd2dca22a
                    GPGSignature: Valid signature by 7D22D5867F2A4236474BF7B850CB390B3C3359C4
             RemovedBasePackages: gnome-terminal-nautilus gnome-terminal 3.34.2-1.fc31
                 LayeredPackages: camorama cheese eog fedora-workstation-repositories gedit gnome-calendar gnome-font-viewer gnome-tweaks hw-probe libratbag-ratbagd lm_sensors nano neofetch
                                  powertop radeontop sysprof systemd-swap tilix tlp
      

      Kernel : 5.3.15
      Gnome : 3.34.1

      Body and Looks

      The screen back has metal, I believe it feels quite sturdy. The rest is reasonable feeling plastic. The material used just loves to imprint grease / fingers which kinda sucks - the keys being the exception thankfully. There was also stickers on the inside which well, are somewhat standard but I thought they were pretty obnoxious so I removed them.

      Typing experience

      It's nothing amazing but it's good enough. I'm not really knowledgeable on keyboards so that's as much as I can say on it, really.

      Performance

      Everything feels quite snappy but I don't game at all on this machine so I'm not pushing it too much other than while I'm compiling or doing other things. The temperature does go up to 75°C and the fans get a little loud but it's not that bad. It's mostly the bottom getting hot so it's not something you notice too much while typing. It also cold boots quite fast, in about 10-20seconds I want to say but I've not benchmarked that. It's my first computer with an SSD so there's that.

      Battery life

      I get about 5hours with tlp installed doing web browsing, some programming occasionally, listening to music on the speakers and chatting. Personally I was kind of expecting more from this considering it's an APU but it seems to be what other people are getting on similar setups so It'll do.

      Conclusion

      Overall, I'm pretty happy with this laptop considering how I bought it for 575$ on sale. I made this review mostly because I wasn't finding much information about this laptop on Linux and well, I don't know, I guess I felt like it. If you have any questions, ask up!

      11 votes
    9. What's a cheap laptop that works well with Linux and is available wordwide?

      Because I'm in Brazil, highly specific brands that do not ship to my country are out of the question, and even the ones that ship usually cost more than I can pay due to currency exchange rate and...

      Because I'm in Brazil, highly specific brands that do not ship to my country are out of the question, and even the ones that ship usually cost more than I can pay due to currency exchange rate and shipping costs themselves. What are some universal brands and models that I can probably find on my location, that won't give me much trouble running Linux?

      I don't require playing games or top performance (4GB 8GB RAM, a nice/vibrant screeen and an i5 processor would be the minimum requirement. SSD would be nice, but for my budget it's a plus. Just something that is durable (with a good guarantee) and works reliably under Linux, especially when it comes to HDMI output, video graphics adapter support, booting from USB, hibernating, sleeping, power management etc.

      Thanks!

      11 votes
    10. Lightest, cheapest laptop out there with best battery life

      My laptop is showing sings of death, and I know I will need a new one soon. Also, I am planning to get a tablet and ditch my smartphone, and to stop using the laptop for browsing content: I'll do...

      My laptop is showing sings of death, and I know I will need a new one soon. Also, I am planning to get a tablet and ditch my smartphone, and to stop using the laptop for browsing content: I'll do most of that to the phone/tablet, and use the laptop as an authoring tool: writing and coding.

      So I am looking for a laptop that is cheap, light, and can keep running for at least 3-5hrs under mild Debian+Emacs load. Ideally around 11"-13".

      20 votes