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    1. Please tell me what you think about this idea for a text editor/Linux Distribution combo

      I know there are similar products I could buy in the US that would give me this experience, but I'm not in the US and I don't have much money. In the old days, my father had some kind of machine...

      I know there are similar products I could buy in the US that would give me this experience, but I'm not in the US and I don't have much money.

      In the old days, my father had some kind of machine that was not a proper laptop and not a proper typewriter. It opened instantly to a text editor. As far as I remember, there was no noticeable boot time. It had a keyboard and an entry for a floppy disk. You typed your stuff, saved it to the floppy disk, probably to send via email or to print in another machine. I loved that machine.

      I love these little gadgets that do one thing and one thing only. And, as someone with severe ADHD, they're often a necessity. If my Kindle had Youtube I would never read a book. If my PS4 had Emacs I would never play a game. The list goes on, but the principle is this: a lot of things are useful to me precisely because of what they cannot do.

      And that is why I wanna recreate my father's crazy computer-typewriter.

      Because I know how to use the command line, it really needs to be in total lockdown: I open it up, it shows a very simple text editor (with a few handy features that make it works even more like a typewriter) that I cannot configure, tinker or alter in any way. It's focused on writing (not editing) literature because that's what I need and other kinds of writing require an internet connection.

      It would save and back up automatically (like a typewriter) to one or more drives at your choice.

      There would need to be a few options because of different screen sizes, the number of screens etc, with an interface to make it easier.

      So the idea is an ultra-minimal, kiosk-mode Linux distribution that can either go on a flash drive or be installed on an old laptop. No package management, no internet connection, no access to the command line, no configuration files, no distractions whatsoever. I wanna forget I'm even using Linux. I wanna recreate my father's typewriter/computer that he never let me touch.

      How do I do this?

      14 votes
    2. Should I Get Into Gentoo? (x-post from /r/Gentoo)

      I've been using Linux for the past 5 to 10 years. I'm not a developer, but a mid-to-advanced user. I don't really know bash (or any programming language for that matter), but I got a folder with...

      I've been using Linux for the past 5 to 10 years. I'm not a developer, but a mid-to-advanced user. I don't really know bash (or any programming language for that matter), but I got a folder with 100 bash scripts I wrote myself. I compile my own Emacs (which I configured from scratch and contains more than 200 crudes functions of my own), Neovim (also configured from scratch) and other programs such as suckless terminal. I'm an i3wm user and currently use MX-Linux. I'm very good at Googling and pattern recognition.

      I got a brand new AMD desktop with a Ryzen processor (no dedicated graphics, wifi works fine with a USB adapter). Should I try Gentoo, or maybe I should study more (maybe with something like Linux Journey)in order to get a better experience?

      Reasons to install Gentoo:

      1. Learning experience
      2. A completely customized desktop experience
      3. Never having to reinstall my operating system again
      4. Masochism
      5. Putting my powerful processor to work
      6. It seems cool (and less painful than LFS)
      7. Some hypothetical performance gain
      3 votes
    3. I'm trying to get a programming job without a degree. Got any tips?

      Hey ~, I'm just out of high school and I want to get a programming job. I don't have a degree (I may go to college, but if I do it'll be in a few months), and little work experience. Do you have...

      Hey ~, I'm just out of high school and I want to get a programming job. I don't have a degree (I may go to college, but if I do it'll be in a few months), and little work experience. Do you have any tips that could help me have a successful job search?

      Here's my resume (somewhat anonymized, but most info is on my Github anyways). I tried to focus on experience I've gained from creating open-source projects to show the skills that I have. I've made sure that all the projects listed have demos, screenshots, usage instructions, etc. Any advice on how I could improve it would be appreciated.

      Thanks!

      22 votes
    4. Deploying containerized Docker instances in production?

      Hello! After spending many development hours in my past years running on Virtualbox/Vagrant-style setups, I've decided to take the plunge into learning Docker, and after getting a few containers...

      Hello! After spending many development hours in my past years running on Virtualbox/Vagrant-style setups, I've decided to take the plunge into learning Docker, and after getting a few containers working, I'm now looking to figure out how to deploy this to production. I'm not a DevOps or infrastructure guy, my bread and butter is software, and although I've become significantly better at deploying & provisioning Linux VPS's, I'm still not entirely confident in my ability to deploy & manage such systems at scale and in production. But, I am now close to running my own business, so these requirements are suddenly going from "nice to have" to "critical".

      As I mentioned, in the past when I've previously developed applications that have been pushed onto the web, I've tended to develop on my local machine, often with no specific configuration environment. If I did use an environment, it'd often be a Vagrant VM instance. From here, I'd push to GitHub, then from my VPS, pull down the changes, run any deployment scripts (recompile, restart nginx, etc), and I'm done.

      I guess what I'm after with Docker is something that's more consistent between dev, testing, & prod, and is also more hands off in the deployment process. Yet, what I'm currently developing still does have differing configuration needs between dev and prod. For example, I'd like to use a hosted DB solution such as DigitalOcean Managed Databases in production, yet I'm totally fine using a Docker container for MySQL for local development. Is something like this possible? Does anyone have any recommendations around how to accomplish this, any do's and dont's, or any catches that are worth mentioning?

      How about automating deployment from GitHub to production? I've never touched any CI/CD tools in my life, yet I know it's a hugely important part of the process when dealing with software in production, especially software that has clients dependent on it to function. Does anything specifically work well with Docker? Or GitHub? Ideally I want to be avoiding manual processes where I have to ssh in, and pull down the latest changes, half-remembering the commands I need to write to recompile and run the application again.

      10 votes
    5. How do you structure larger projects?

      I'll be writing a relatively large piece of scientific code for the first time, and before I begin I would at least like to outline how the project will be structured so that I don't run into...

      I'll be writing a relatively large piece of scientific code for the first time, and before I begin I would at least like to outline how the project will be structured so that I don't run into headaches later on. The problem is, I don't have much experience structuring large projects. Up until now most of the code I have written as been in the form of python scripts that I string together to form an ad-hoc pipeline for analysis, or else C++ programs that are relatively self contained. My current project is much larger in scope. It will consist of four main 'modules' (I'm not sure if this is the correct term, apologies if not) each of which consist of a handful of .cpp and .h files. The schematic I have in mind for how it should look is something like:

      src
       ├──Module1 (Initializer)
       │         ├ file1.cpp
       │         ├ file1.h
       │         │...
       │         └ Makefile
       ├───Module2 (solver)
       │          ├ file1.cpp
       │          ├ file1.h
       │          │...
       │          └ Makefile
       ├───Module3 (Distribute)
       │          ├ file1.cpp
       │          └Makefile 
       └ Makefile
      

      Basically, I build each self-contained 'module', and use the object files produced there to build my main program. Is there anything I should keep in mind here, or is this basically how such a project should be structured?

      I imagine the particularly structure will be dependent on my project, but I am more interested in general principles to keep in mind.

      15 votes
    6. I want to get into IT as a career, but I have no previous experience. What essential skills should I know?

      I've recently started taking some IT and programming classes at a local college because I've always been interested in IT as a career but I've never had any sort of professional experience in the...

      I've recently started taking some IT and programming classes at a local college because I've always been interested in IT as a career but I've never had any sort of professional experience in the field. Are there any skills that I need to definitely know, or any sort of certifications that I can get in order to get my foot in the door and start applying for IT focused jobs?

      24 votes
    7. Working as a contractor in IT

      Does anyone have any experience working as a contractor in the IT field? I have 4 years of experience in the IT industry, all of it as a full time direct hire. I may have an opportunity to work...

      Does anyone have any experience working as a contractor in the IT field? I have 4 years of experience in the IT industry, all of it as a full time direct hire. I may have an opportunity to work for a very large company on a 2 year contract at fairly reasonable salary increase. The most important part to me is that I will be getting some experience off of the service desk as well, which I can use to continue my career going forward.

      My main concern is that I am unfamiliar with contract work. I do know that I get health benefits / 401k / sick days, but I assume there must be a drawback to being a contractor, right? I feel like being a contractor is inherently more unstable than being an actual hire. The position I am being considered for is a 2 year contract, but I worry that the position could simply disappear a few months in and I'd be out of a job. Is this a fair feeling, and is there any way I can gauge how true this might be for my position? Is there something I could discreetly ask in my interview that might help me understand if this is a stable position?

      If anyone has any experience as a contractor, I'd love to hear it.

      4 votes
    8. Using ghoneycutt/pam puppet module

      Hi guys, I'm really stumped and looking for a nudge in the right direction for how to utilise the ghoneycutt/pam module in puppet. Relatively new to this but got what I'd like to think as most the...

      Hi guys,

      I'm really stumped and looking for a nudge in the right direction for how to utilise the ghoneycutt/pam module in puppet. Relatively new to this but got what I'd like to think as most the basics down.

      I've configured a few things using modules such as NTP, SSSD and NSSWITCH but I'm just stuck on how I can use this module and pull info from Hiera into it.

      So, lets start with

      .yaml file:

      
              ### nsswitch.conf authentication configuration
      
              nsswitch::passwd:     'files sss'
      
              nsswitch::shadow:     'files sss'
      
      
      

      And then looking at the nsswitch.pp file:

      
              ### nsswitch.config setup
      
              class profile::linux::base::nsswitch {
      
              # Get heira values
      
                class { 'nsswitch':
      
                  passwd    => [lookup('nsswitch::passwd')],
      
                  shadow    => [lookup('nsswitch::shadow')],
      
      
      

      Simple enough to call the values I want and works how I want, now I'm trying to do the same type of thing for PAM using the ghoneycutt/pam module and there doesn't seem to be much info on how to use it, or it's just not sinking in for me.

      Some of my PAM Heira values:

              pam::pam_auth_lines:
                - '# Managed by Hiera key pam::pam_auth_lines'
                - 'auth        required      pam_env.so'
                - 'auth        sufficient    pam_fprintd.so'
                - 'auth        sufficient    pam_unix.so nullok try_first_pass'
                - 'auth        requisite     pam_succeed_if.so uid >= 500 quiet'
                - 'auth        sufficient    pam_sss.so use_first_pass'
                - 'auth        required      pam_deny.so'
              pam::pam_account_lines:
                - '# Managed by Hiera key pam::pam_account_lines'
                - 'account     required      pam_unix.so'
                - 'account     sufficient    pam_localuser.so'
                - 'account     sufficient    pam_succeed_if.so uid < 500 quiet'
                - 'account     [default=bad success=ok user_unknown=ignore] pam_sss.so'
                - 'account     required      pam_permit.so'
              pam::pam_password_lines:
                - '# Managed by Hiera key pam::pam_password_lines'
                - 'password    requisite     pam_cracklib.so try_first_pass retry=3 type='
                - 'password    sufficient    pam_unix.so sha512 shadow nullok try_first_pass use_authtok'
                - 'password    sufficient    pam_sss.so use_authtok'
                - 'password    required      pam_deny.so'
      

      Some things I've tried:

      1:

              class profile::linux::base::pam {
                # resources
                class { 'pam':
                  password-auth-ac  => [
                    lookup('pam::pam_auth_lines')],
                    lookup('pam::pam_account_lines')],
                    lookup('pam::pam_password_lines')],
                    lookup('pam::pam_session_lines')],
                 }
      
      

      2:

      
      	
      	      passwd  => [
      	
      	      lookup('pam::pam_auth_lines'),
      	
      	      lookup('pam::pam_account_lines'),
      	
      	      lookup('pam::pam_password_lines'),
      	
      	      lookup('pam::pam_session_lines'),
      	
      	      ],
      	
      	  }
      
      
              include ::pam
      
      	class profile::linux::base::pam {
      	
      	  # resources
      	
      	    include ::pam
      
      	         lookup('pam::pam_auth_lines')
      	
      	}
      
      
      

      I've tried a few other ways and can't get it to work as I want it to. Can anyone help?

      Thanks

      4 votes
    9. What helped you succeed or improve in your field?

      As an undergrad computer science student, I'll be starting my career soon. I want to make it enjoyable, productive, avoid too many mistakes and generally try to succeed. If you want to share...

      As an undergrad computer science student, I'll be starting my career soon. I want to make it enjoyable, productive, avoid too many mistakes and generally try to succeed.

      If you want to share anything that could be beneficial to succeeding in various tech fields, either books, advice or really anything else - I'd like to hear it.

      Books
      Are there any books that you can recommend, which helped you in your career. From hard technical skills, to soft interpersonal skills required to succeed in software engineering, systems engineering, or similar fields. Books oriented towards problem solving, algorithms, good engineering practices, etc.

      A book I found recommended quite a lot, but didn't get around to reading just yet is Designing Data-Intensive Applications.

      Blogs or any other sources are welcome as well.

      A bit of background

      I'm currently an undergrad computer science student, but I started programming around 8 years ago and finished a few projects on my own. I've been working at a small software company for the past 2 years, but I don't really feel like I'm improving as much as I could - mostly due to constrained budgets and short deadlines, which don't allow me to grow. I want to read and improve my skills on my own time as well.

      I'm not sure if this topic has been discussed before - I'm new to Tildes and haven't figured out how to filter results to only display topics in ~comp.

      20 votes
    10. I'm gonna start as an algorithms monitor at my college, looking for tips on how to better help the students

      I don't know what is the correct word in English, but I'll be one of those guys who will teach a "class" consisting on answering questions and guiding them through the exercises. The content is...

      I don't know what is the correct word in English, but I'll be one of those guys who will teach a "class" consisting on answering questions and guiding them through the exercises.

      The content is very basic algorithms in C, so things like functions, pointers, and structs are off the scope. Here is the repo I made with the solutions for last semester. I'm starting in the second semester, so I have everything fresh in my memory.

      I welcome anything you can give but I'm not necessarily seeking technical advice since the teachers have that covered. What I'd really like to know is what you consider to be some good examples, attitudes, and approaches for this particular position. Thanks.

      7 votes
    11. On hiring for tech positions: How do you get what you need from the HR department?

      I wish I had a dollar for every time I heard a manager complain, “The HR department included ‘must have college degree’ in the job req even though I don’t care” or “They asked for 5 years of...

      I wish I had a dollar for every time I heard a manager complain, “The HR department included ‘must have college degree’ in the job req even though I don’t care” or “They asked for 5 years of experience in a technology that’s only been around for 3” or “I have no idea why they rejected this candidate without even contacting me.”

      Still, in many cases you don’t have a choice. If you want to hire someone, you need to deal with HR, at least to a small degree – especially if you work in a big company.

      So I’m writing a feature story for technology managers, collecting real-world advice from people who learned their lessons the hard way. Here’s the questions I’d like you to answer:

      • Tell me about a frustration you had with the HR department (in regard to hiring). That is, tell me a personal story of HR-gone-wrong. Because we all love schadenfreude, and that gives me an emotional example with which to begin.
      • Let’s say you have a new opening in your department. In what ways do you involve HR? (That could be anything from, “give them general guidelines and let them choose the best candidates for me to interview” to “I do the search myself, and use HR only for on-boarding.”) What makes you choose that path? How much choice do you have in the matter?
      • What weaknesses have you discovered in your HR department’s ability to serve the needs of a tech-focused department?
      • What have you done to cope with those weaknesses? Which of those efforts worked, and which failed?
      • What do you wish you knew “n” years ago about dealing with your company’s HR department?
      • So that I can give the reader some context: Let me know how to refer to you in the article (at least, “Esther, a software architect at a Midwest insurance company”), and give me some idea of your company size (because the processes appropriate for a 70-person company aren’t the same for one with 7,000 employees).

      You don’t have to answer all those questions! I asked these to get the conversation going. Tell me as much or as little as you like.

      Please don’t assume that I think HR always sucks. However, there isn’t as much to learn from “why HR is your friend.” The idea here is to help techie managers cope when HR doesn’t offer what you hoped for.

      16 votes
    12. Cheapest way to put a hard drive on the internet.

      I'm currently researching the cheapest off site backup system and it looks like leaving a hdd at a friends house is the best option. The only thing I am stuck on is how to access it remotely. I...

      I'm currently researching the cheapest off site backup system and it looks like leaving a hdd at a friends house is the best option. The only thing I am stuck on is how to access it remotely. I need a system on a chip that I can plug in to the hdd and Ethernet and that provides ssh access. My first thought was a raspberry pi with a sata to usb cable but since I will only be doing weekly backups it makes no sense to keep the drive spinning 24/7. I need some way to turn off the drive and then back on over the internet. From what I understand there are linux programs that can do it but only directly over sata because the command doesn't work on usb sata controllers.

      What I need is a cheap linux SoC that has sata and ethernet. Does anyone have any ideas?

      13 votes
    13. How do I hack makefiles?

      If you have built from source, then you know the relief when nothing interesting comes out of ./configure && make && make install. In fact, the less interesting the output of these commands, the...

      If you have built from source, then you know the relief when nothing interesting comes out of ./configure && make && make install. In fact, the less interesting the output of these commands, the better.

      But occasionally, the source build process is so horrifying that you end up having to modify the configure script or makefile yourself.

      So far I have only been able to do this when I was lucky enough to find some poor, destitute stranger who had pretty much the same problem as me ( most recent I can think of is GNUTLS, where I had to adjust the version requirements for nettle ) and that is a problem -- there must be some way to learn this myself.

      Is this just something that comes with time and experience, or does anyone have a reliable guide or resource for modifying makefiles and configure scripts? I would appreciate advice / discussion: I am tired of "getting lucky" with these!

      16 votes
    14. Best 120mm fans for a desktop?

      I was looking for preferences on 120/140mm case fans. RGB is a want, but not at the expense of quality fans. I'm pretty new to the topic and not super familiar with the technical side. So open to...

      I was looking for preferences on 120/140mm case fans. RGB is a want, but not at the expense of quality fans.

      I'm pretty new to the topic and not super familiar with the technical side. So open to reading more in depth too.

      Thanks!

      7 votes
    15. Where would a beginner start with data compression? What are some good books for it?

      Mostly the title. I have experience with Python, and I was thinking of learning more about data compression. How should I proceed? And what are some good books I could read, both about specifics...

      Mostly the title. I have experience with Python, and I was thinking of learning more about data compression. How should I proceed? And what are some good books I could read, both about specifics and abstracts of data compression, data management, data in general.

      15 votes